Chimney Sweeping Eastbourne
We sweep – We clean – We leave

Chimney Sweep Mark Styles cleans all types of domestic chimneys and flues. Email here for quote
marridge Clean and sweep - Chimney sweep based in Brighton/Saltdean

Our chimney sweep covers Eastbourne

Chimney Sweep Mark is insured for chimney sweeping in Eastbourne. We are a professional and friendly company and offer:

  • Chimney sweeping
  • Complete safety inspections
  • All types of chimney swept & vacuumed
  • Wood burners & stoves
  • Full chimney service & restoration
  • Woodstove restoration
  • Bird nests removed
  • Chimney pots, cowls and bird guards
  • Free advice on chimney liners
  • Hetas approved chimney sweep
  • Federation of British Chimney Sweeps

Clean and sweep, your chimney sweep, will make sure that the job will be professionally done to your expectation.

Brighton - chimney sweep availabe and insured for chimney sweeping

Chimney sweeping Insurance

Chimney sweep Mark Styles is insured against any liability of his chimney sweeping work in Eastbourne.

Need an Eastbourne Chimney Sweep?

Do you have any question or queries about chimney sweeping in Eastbounre?
Want to book an appointment?
Call me at 01273 659 295 or 07976 711558

Mark, your Chimney sweep, covers Eastbourne

About Eastbourne – East Sussex

Eastbourne is a town, seaside resort and borough in the non-metropolitan county of East Sussex on the south coast of England, 19 miles (31 km) east of Brighton. Eastbourne is immediately to the east of Beachy Head, the highest chalk sea cliff in Great Britain and part of the larger Eastbourne Downland Estate.

With a seafront consisting largely of Victorian hotels, a pier and a Napoleonic era fort and military museum, Eastbourne was developed at the direction of the Duke of Devonshire from 1859 from four separate hamlets. It has a growing population, a broad economic base and is home to companies in a wide range of industries.

Though Eastbourne is a relatively new town, there is evidence of human occupation in the area from the Stone Age. The town grew as a fashionable tourist resort largely thanks to prominent landowner, William Cavendish, later to become the Duke of Devonshire. Cavendish appointed architect Henry Currey to design a street plan for the town, but not before sending him to Europe to draw inspiration. The resulting mix of architecture is typically Victorian and remains a key feature of Eastbourne.

As a seaside resort, Eastbourne derives a large and increasing income from tourism, with revenue from traditional seaside attractions augmented by conferences, public events and cultural sightseeing. The other main industries in Eastbourne include trade and retail, healthcare, education, construction, manufacturing, professional scientific and the technical sector.

History of Eastbourne

Pre-Roman

Flint mines and Stone Age artefacts have been found in the surrounding countryside of the Eastbourne Downs.

A Bronze Age site of national importance was discovered in Hydneye lake at Shinewater in 1995.

Celtic people are believed to have settled on the Eastbourne Downland in 500 BC.

Roman era

There are Roman remains buried beneath the town, such as a Roman bath and section of pavement between Eastbourne Pier and the Redoubt Fortress. There is also a Roman villa near the entrance to the Pier and the present Queens Hotel.

In 2014, skeletal remains of a woman who lived around 425 AD were discovered in the vicinity of Beachy Head on the Eastbourne Downland Estate. The remains were found to be of a 30-year-old woman who grew up in East Sussex, but had genetic heritage from sub-Saharan Africa, giving her black skin and an African skeletal structure. Her ancestors came from below the Saharan region, at a time when the Roman Empire extended only as far as North Africa.

Anglo-Saxon era

An Anglo-Saxon charter, circa 963 AD, describes a landing stage and stream at Burne.

The original name came from the ‘Burne’ or stream which ran through today’s Old Town area of Eastbourne. All that can be seen of the Burne, or Bourne, is the small pond in Motcombe Gardens. The bubbling source is guarded by a statue of Neptune. Motcombe Gardens are overlooked by St. Mary’s Church, a Norman church which allegedly lies on the site of a Saxon ‘moot’, or meeting place. This gives Motcombe its name.

In 2014 local metal-detectorist Darrin Simpson found a coin minted during the reign of Æthelberht II of East Anglia (died 794), in a field near the town. It is believed that the coin may have led to Æthelberht’s beheading by Offa of Mercia, as it had been struck as a sign of independence. Describing the coin, expert Christopher Webb, said, “This new discovery is an important and unexpected addition to the numismatic history of 8th century England.”

Norman era

Following the Norman conquest, the Hundred of what is now Eastbourne, was held by Robert, Count of Mortain, William the Conqueror’s half brother. The Domesday Book lists 28 ploughlands, a church, a watermill, fisheries and salt pans.

The Book referred to the area as ‘Borne’. ‘East’ was added to ‘Borne’ in the 13th century, renaming the town.

20th century

During the First World War, Summerdown Camp, a convalescent facility, opened in 1915 near the South Downs to treat soldiers who were injured during trench warfare or seriously ill. It was the largest of this type in the UK during this war, treating 150,000; 80% were able to return to fight. The facility was dismantled in 1920. An exhibition about the history of the camp was held in Eastbourne for several months in 2015.

In the summer of 1956, the town came to national and worldwide attention, when Dr John Bodkin Adams, a general practitioner serving the town’s wealthier patients, was arrested for the murder of an elderly widow. Rumours had been circulating since 1935 regarding the frequency of his being named in patients’ wills (132 times between 1946 and 1956) and the gifts he was given (including two Rolls Royces). Figures of up to 400 murders were reported in British and foreign newspapers, but after a controversial trial at the Old Bailey which gripped the nation for 17 days in March 1957, Adams was found not guilty. He was struck off for four years but resumed his practice in Eastbourne in 1961. According to Scotland Yard‘s archives, he is thought to have killed up to 163 patients in the Eastbourne area.

21st century

In 2009, the new Towner Gallery was opened, abutting the listed Congress Theatre built in 1963.

In 2016–19 extensive remodelling work was undertaken to the prominent Arndale Centre, which takes up most of the town centre, and was originally built by Legal & General Assurance in the 1980s. This was then renamed The Beacon. The remodelling including the addition of a brand new cinema run by Cineworld.

On 22 November 2019, a fire broke out in the basement of the Claremont Hotel. The nearby Pier Hotel was also evacuated.

The work is released under CC-BY-SA and copyright by http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Content is from Wikipedia and therefore under copyright. This is the link to the author’s history page.

Need an Eastbourne Chimney Sweep?

Do you have any question or queries about chimney sweeping in Eastbourne?
Want to book an appointment?
Call me at 01273 659 295 or 07976 711558

We cover the following areas for chimney sweeping around Eastbourne:

Eastbourne, East Sussex, BN21

Arlington, East Sussex, BN26
Newhaven, East Sussex, BN9
Pevensey, East Sussex, BN24
Polegate, East Sussex, BN26
Westham, East Sussex, BN24
Seven Sisters, East Sussex, BN25
Stone Cross, Kent, TN25

Back to the areas we cover

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Why is chimney sweeping important

Chimney sweeping - how often does my chimney be swept?

The answer of course depends how often you use the fire and which fuel you use.

  • Smokeless fuel – At least once a year

  • Wood – A minimum of once a year but more depending on usage

  • Bituminous coal is banned and no longer used

  • Gas- Once a year

Chimney sweeping - do I need to sweep my chimney if I only burn smokeless fuel?

The answer is that chimney sweeping is recommended, if you are using the following fuels:

  • Smokeless fuels – including Anthracite, semi-Anthracite, Gas or a ‘low volatile steam coal’
  • Bituminous coal – sometimes ‘soft coal’ or ‘black coal’ and contains Bitumen… it is probably the most commonly sold coal in the UK
  • Wood – some woods with a high moisture content will reduce your fires heat output and freshly cut wood will create a lot of smoke making your chimney dirty
  • Oil – including both gas oil and kerosene
  • Gas – including mains and LPG

Not only does Mark provide excellent chimney sweeping and takes the time to explain about what he is doing in a friendly manner, … Highly recommended